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Tuesday
May062014

Homemade Ice Cream - an Update


ceramics from Fifty One and a Half

 

I've been posting about the joys of making homemade ice cream for a long time now but I have modified my recipe for the better and I wanted to share it with you.  Making homemade ice cream is super easy and delicious. Not only do you know exactly what is in your ice cream, but you can make any combination of flavors that you want.  

In my old recipe, I used a simple mixture of cream, half and half, sugar and whatever flavorings I wanted (I did not want to make ice cream with eggs). Now this worked just fine and was absolutely lucious and delicious. The problem was keeping the leftover ice cream in the freezer - it would form ice crystals and the ice cream wasn't so creamy anymore.  This problem is solved by simply adding a cornstarch slurry and a little light corn syrup into the mixture, which prevents this crystallization. 

This method is based on Jeni Brotton Bauer's ice cream making methods.  She is the owner of Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream stores and has written a book about making homemade ice cream.  She figured out the chemistry of making ice cream and came up with a method that ensures a creamy mixture that will not form ice crystals.  In her recipe, there is an added step of adding cream cheese to the mixture, which I have omitted.  I wanted to see if I could keep it simple and still have a mixture that remained creamy.  It does.  

It's important in this recipe to let the mixture boil for 4 minutes - this is another step that she insists makes for a creamy ice cream because it boils off some of the water.  So don't rush this step or skip it.  To store the ice cream, I used to use just a tupperware with plastic wrap pressed flat right onto the ice cream but my new favorite item is this ice cream storage tub from Williams Sonoma.  It has a great width profile for the freezer and the top is airtight. 

I've made two types of ice cream for this post - a blackberry flavor and a vanilla honey flavor.  They both use fresh vanilla bean, which I highly recommend.  It's much better than vanilla extract.   I get my vanilla beans from Beanilla and store them in an airtight container.  You can sub out the blackberries for blueberries, strawberries - whatever.  

If you really want to get into the fun of ice cream making, check out these tips from Jeni

 

Homemade Ice Cream

for a printable recipe, click here

adapted from Jeni Brotton Bower

Try to use real vanilla bean in you can - it makes a huge difference in the taste.  You can also swap out the blackberries for the same amount of any other fruit - blueberries, strawberries, etc. 

Ingredients:

Blackberry Ice Cream 

makes about one quart

  • 2 cups milk
  • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1¼ cups heavy cream
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ of a vanilla bean, seeds scraped and pod retained (or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract) 
  • 1 cup blackberries, pureed (makes about ½ cup of puree) 

Instructions:

In a measuring cup, stir together ¼ cup of the milk and the cornstarch; set slurry aside. In a 4-qt. saucepan, whisk together remaining milk and the cream, sugar, syrup, salt, vanilla bean seeds and vanilla bean pod.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook for 4 minutes, whisking the mixture so the vanilla beans seeds evenly disperse.  Whisk in the slurry.  Return to a boil and cook, stirring, until thickened, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Remove vanilla bean pod and whisk in blackberry puree.  Pour into a 4-cup glass Pyrex and refrigerate for several hours (or overnight) until very cold. 

Pour mixture into an ice cream maker and process according to manufacturer's instructions (in my Cuisinart ice cream maker, it takes about 25 - 30 minutes).  Transfer ice cream to a storage container and freeze until set.

Vanilla Honey Ice Cream

for a printable recipe, click here

makes about one quart

  • 2 cups milk
  • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1¼ cups heavy cream
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ of a vanilla bean, seeds scraped and pod retained (or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract) 
  • ¼ cup good quality honey 

Instructions:

In a measuring cup, stir together ¼ cup of the milk and the cornstarch; set slurry aside. In a 4-qt. saucepan, whisk together remaining milk and the cream, sugar, syrup, salt, vanilla bean seeds and vanilla bean pod.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook for 4 minutes, whisking the mixture so the vanilla beans seeds evenly disperse.  Whisk in the slurry.  Return to a boil and cook, stirring, until thickened, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Remove vanilla bean pod and whisk in honey.  Pour into a 4-cup glass Pyrex and refrigerate for several hours (or overnight) until very cold. 

Pour mixture into an ice cream maker and process according to manufacturer's instructions (in my Cuisinart ice cream maker, it takes about 25 - 30 minutes).  Transfer ice cream to a storage container and freeze until set.

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Reader Comments (13)

Thanks so much for these wonderful tips! I wondered why my homemade ice cream lost its creaminess. I can't wait to try your recipe, Elaine. The Italian Dish is one of my favorite newsletters.

May 6, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterArlene

This sounds wonderful and I can't wait to make the berry for my family ... but you lost me at one point: leftover ice cream? What's that? I never seem to have any to snack on the next day. But this is worth trying anyway!

May 6, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterKaren

Corn syrup? Seriously? Ew! No thanks....

May 6, 2014 | Unregistered Commentertina

@tina you do realize corn syrup is not the same thing as high fructose corn syrup, right?

May 6, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterAshley

We were in savannah two weeks ago, and I bought the tupelo honey from the Savannah bee shop. It is delicious! I am going to make this recipe. Something tells me I should have bought two bottles.

May 7, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterPatti

These recipes sound delicious. My grandson is very allergic to corn, so we cannot use corn syrup and corn starch. It should still turn out great even if I leave out corn syrup and corn starch, correct? And is there a good substitute if I do need something like this included?

May 8, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterCeleste

I am in the UK and we don't have corn syrup. I am wondering what I could use instead, would our Tate & Lyles Golden Syrup be a good substitute?

May 11, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterJeannette

From The Italian Dish:

Celeste: You can see in my recipe index that I have a lot of ice cream recipes that do not use corn syrup or corn starch - the ice cream is still delicious. It is simply a matter of the leftover ice cream becoming a little bit crystalized. Just use one of my older recipes that do not include the corn ingredients.

Jeannette: Oh you don't have corn syrup there? I am not sure if the Tate & Lyles syrup would have the same effect with the ice cream in preventing crystal from forming. Sorry, but I just don't know! You could just give it a try and see.

May 12, 2014 | Registered Commenter[Elaine]

Great recipe, thank you so much!

May 15, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterMina

Hi Elaine,
I just found your blog while searching for a homemade ricotta recipe. Can't wait to try it. I like the sound of the one with buttermilk because heavy cream might hurt me, but I am wondering if the buttermilk one will taste as good as the one made with cream.

Joan

it looks delicious!

June 17, 2014 | Unregistered Commenterdina

I love your blog. Do you have a recipe for frozen yogurt?

July 4, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterAutumn

simple recipe :)

September 21, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterMichaela

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