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Honeymoon Ravioli

Easy Italian Pulled Pork

Learn to Make Fresh Pasta (with a video!)

Nutella Bread for Dessert or for Breakfast!

 

Tips for Homemade Marinara Sauce

Breakfast Fruit Walkaway is a family favorite

I love to sew - come on over and see what I'm making!

Make Homemade Limoncello

 

These Aren't Pasta Noodles - They're Zucchini Noodles!

Chocolate Zucchini Cake

A Delicious Vegetarian Dish: Pasta alla Norma

Love knitting? Come read my knitting blog, Italian Dish Knits.

Eating Our Way Through the Amalfi Coast

My Camera Bag that does not look like a Camera Bag!

Make Whipped Cream That Lasts

My Favorite Chocolate Cake Recipe

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Lemon Cake from Capri

Make Healthy Homemade Apple Chips

Butternut Squash Soup

 Thanks, Mom!

 

Speedy Mini Lasagna Stacks

 

Winter Caprese Salad

Learn How to Make Artisan Bread with no Kneading for Pennies

 

Strawberry Cheesecake Parfaits Require No Baking

Make Pie Dough in 60 Seconds!

Make Your Own Vanilla Extract

 

Spicy Bucatini all'Amatriciana - a Roman Classic

My Mom's Pork Chops

Chocolate Panna Cotta

 


My Five Inexpensive Kitchen Essentials

Beet Ravioli with Goat Cheese

Thoughts About Making Espresso

Wednesday
May272015

Artisan Bread Update and a Bread Cloche Giveaway!

In all the years of writing this blog, the most popular post ever has been the one I wrote about No-Knead Artisan Bread.  This method, popularized by Zoe Francois and Jeffrey Hertzberg, revolutionized homemade bread baking.  Instead of making up a batch of dough every time you want to bake bread, you make up a large batch of very wet dough and let it do a long, cold fermentation in the refrigerator - no kneading, no fuss. You can store the dough in the fridge for up to two weeks, tear a hunk of dough off and make bread whenever you feel like it. A variation of this method was also developed by Jim Lahey of the Sullivan Street Bakery. Suddenly, it seemed, everyone was making homemade bread with these methods.  In the five years since I wrote that post, I've learned a few things and tweaked the recipe a little.  I thought it was time to do an update.  

Zoe and Jeffrey's approach is to make a very wet dough, let it rise and then let it sit overnight in the fridge. You then shape a piece of the dough, let it rise and then bake it on a pizza stone in the oven.  They liked to place a cup of water into a pan beneath the rack with the bread, creating a little steam for the crust.  In Jim Lahey's version, a smaller batch of wet dough is worked up and allowed to rise about 18 hours then wrapped in a towel to rise again and baked in a heavy cast iron or ceramic pot.  Both methods are terrific.  I like making up a larger batch of dough so I can keep it in the fridge and just make bread or rolls whenever I want.  I was baking my bread on a pizza stone but then tried Lahey's version of baking it in my Le Creuset pot. I really liked doing it this way and that's how I've been doing it for a while.

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Tuesday
Apr212015

Ragu with Fresh Tajarin Pasta

We were recently in Seattle, visiting one of our sons, and had dinner at Spinasse. Spinasse is known around Seattle as one of the best places to go for homemade pasta and it did not disappoint. There were a lot of moans and groans coming from our table. The meal was delicious, from the amuse that they brought out (a heavenly little bite of crostini with butter and anchovy) to an oustanding dessert of coconut gelato with dark chocolate flakes.  But the real star of the show was, indeed, the pastas.

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Friday
Mar272015

Chocolate Cinnamon Babkallah

I discovered this recipe last year and made it for my youngest son who loves both challah bread and chocolate. This is a cross between a chocolate babka and challah bread and it's so good.  I love the combination of the chocolate and cinnamon together.  

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